Promoting healthy lifestyles for children & families

Projects

The role of fortified beverages in childhood obesity prevention: Implications for current state and local policy development

For the study "The role of fortified beverages in childhood obesity prevention: Implications for current state and local policy development", UCB, with California Center for Public Health Advocacy (CCPHA), conducted the nutritional assessment of 25 fortified beverages and of the nutrition/health claims made in product marketing campaigns.

Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Literature Reviews: Young Children (0-5 years old)

The Center conducted two literature reviews of intervention studies aimed at promoting healthy eating and physical activity in young children (0-5 years old): 1) in child care and preschool settings, and 2) that are family-based.

California Childcare Food Assessment

The Center assisted with a study to inform the public health, policy and summer lunch and after school communities about the foods and beverages served to children in California, to assess how well they met the standards contained in the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and to develop policy recommendations based upon the research results.

Healthy Eating and Activity for Children

The Family Fitness: Child Care Healthy Eating and Activity project promoted the balancing of healthy eating and physical activity among food stamp eligible parents and children. The project engaged families in child care sites in Contra Costa, Shasta and LA Counties.

Enhanced Nutrition Education Intervention

Enhanced Nutrition Education Intervention worked with caregivers to ensure that they understood the importance of good nutrition for children, and in addition, to help the caregivers adopt healthy eating and activity habits themselves.

Evaluation of the Period of Adiposity Rebound for the Prevention of Obesity

The Center conducted a pilot study to assess the relationship of dietary intake, caregiver feeding practices, and physical activity to the timing of adiposity rebound, which has been shown to be related to risk for subsequent obesity among Mexican preschool children.